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Reckless Driving
Reckless driving can either be a misdemeanor or a felony charge.

Misdemeanor Reckless Driving
Misdemeanor reckless driving is a class A misdemeanor, punishable by a jail sentence of up to one year in prison and a fine of up to $2,500. Under 625 ILCS 5/11-503, you can be charged with reckless driving for:

(1) driving a vehicle with "willful or wanton disregard for the safety or property of others"; or

(2) knowingly causing a vehicle to become airborne.

Section (2) is very specific and only refers to the action of knowingly causing a vehicle to become airborne such as speeding over a railroad crossing incline or another inclined roadway as a ramp. Section (1) is much more broad and means that any driving that poses a danger to people or property may be charged as reckless driving. Despite the broad wording of the statute, the prosecutor must state the specific actions that it claims constitute reckless driving such as excessive speeding, drifting, or something else.

Felony Reckless Driving
Reckless driving is a class 4 felony if the alleged reckless driving causes bodily harm to a child or a school crossing guard, punishable by a prison sentence of between one and three years.

Aggravated Reckless Driving
A driver may be charged with aggravated reckless driving if the alleged reckless driving caused great bodily harm or permanent disfigurement to someone (not a child or school crossing guard). Aggravated reckless driving is a class 4 felony, punishable by a prison sentence between one and three years.

Aggravated reckless driving may also be a class 3 felony, punishabe by a prison sentence of between two and five years in prison, if the alleged reckless driving caused great bodily harm, permanent disability, or disfigurement to a child or crossing guard.

If you get a ticket for reckless driving, you will be required to have an attorney represent you at your court date.